BlogThe pieces posted on the blog reflect Ian’s interests in history and in life in general. They cover subjects such as seafaring, local studies, women’s history, photography, war and peace.

LOST PROPERTY: IDENTIFYING THE SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY SWASH CHANNEL WRECK

By | Local history, Maritime archaeology, Maritime history, Shipwreck history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – March, 2017. A photomosaic of the Fame wrecksite. (C) Bournemouth University The Swash Channel leads to the main entrance of Poole Harbour in Dorset, and this is where the Swash Channel Wreck lies. The original name of the ship has been lost…

Read More

A BALINGER FOR THE KING

By | History of technology, Maritime archaeology, Maritime history, Medieval history, Naval history, Shipbuilding, War history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – July 2016. Conjectural sketch of a balinger (C) Ian Friel 2015. Balingers were the frigates of medieval sea warfare: relatively fast, relatively small and suitable for a wide range of tasks, short of taking on a major enemy ship singlehanded….

Read More

DAUGHTERS OF ENGLAND

By | Local history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – March 2016. Stedham and Iping on the 1st edtion Ordnance Survey Map, 1813.  By the 1880s the area called ‘Trotton Common’ was known as Stedham Common, and was the site of the temporary hospital. This piece is a small contribution…

Read More

THE GRAVEYARD OF THE GREAT SHIPS

By | Local history, Maritime archaeology, Maritime history, Medieval history, Naval history, Political history, Shipwreck history, War history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – October 2015. The site at Bursledon: to the left, the site of the Grace Dieu, to the right, the possible site of the Holy Ghost. ‘But how do we know that?’ is a good question for people to ask of historians and…

Read More

THE CLOTHESLINE OF FATE

By | General history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – September 2014. A minor incident at the weekend started me thinking again about the question of why things happen. I was writing an email to someone about a ship’s bell I’d seen in a museum store the day before. Realising…

Read More

DRAWING WITH LIGHT

By | Social history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – September 2014.   A young couple photographed at Southsea, Hampshire, probably early 1900s One hundred and seventy-five years ago this year, the invention of photography was announced to the world.   In January 1839, William Henry Fox Talbot read a paper…

Read More

FIRESHIPS AND TERROR WEAPONS (PART 1)

By | Maritime archaeology, Maritime history, Religious history, War history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – August 2017. Although this 1956 reconstruction was intended to represent the Pilgrim Fathers’ 120-ton ship Mayflower of 1620, its design was largely based  on late 16th century English sources.  As such it gives a good idea of the appearance of the privately-owned ships in the…

Read More

THE ROAD TO HELL

By | Map history, Political history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – May, 2014. Weimar and the Ettersberg, from Conti-Atlas für Kraftfahrer (c 1935).   It’s strange what evidence of history you can find in banal, everyday objects.   On an impulse, years ago, I bought an old road atlas of Germany in a secondhand…

Read More

THE GHOST OF REGINALD HINE

By | Local history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – April 2014. Minsden Chapel in 1973 – a rather out-of-focus photograph taken with my old Instamatic camera. ‘And what is the use of it all, anyway?’ That question must have been posed to most historians at one time or another,…

Read More

THE SEASICK HISTORIAN

By | Maritime history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – April 2014. STS  Sir Winston Churchill, somewhere in the English Channel, December 1978.   OK, I’ve enhanced the photo: it wasn’t this green.  I was, though. December, 1978. The Sail Training Schooner Sir Winston Churchill sets out from Cherbourg on a grey morning into Force 8 winds……

Read More

THE ANNIVERSARY WALTZ…

By | Maritime history, War history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – February 2014. A different sort of 1914 anniversary:  a plaque in Southampton marking the centenary of the death of the composer Charles Dibdin Anniversaries are not easy to escape, at least if you’re trying to interpret history.  The current plethora of…

Read More

THE GOOD NEIGHBOUR?

By | House history, Local history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – January 2014. Wm BUDDEN LAND 6½ INCH BEYOND THIS WALL 1822 This rather odd property marker is in a garden wall on the outskirts of Chichester in West Sussex.   The stone faces out, annexing 6½ inches (16.5 cm) of what…

Read More

WHAT’S IN A PICTURE?

By | General history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – January 2014. The aerial photo used as a header on this blog was chosen because it reflects some of my historical interests – the sea, the development of the landscape and local history. The picture shows the entrance to Chichester…

Read More

IN WITH THE OLD…?

By | Maritime history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – January 2014. The first day of the New Year seems as good a time as any to start a new blog.   The old saying goes ‘out with the old, in with the new’, but it’s not quite appropriate for…

Read More