Category

Maritime history

LOST PROPERTY: IDENTIFYING THE SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY SWASH CHANNEL WRECK

By | Local history, Maritime archaeology, Maritime history, Shipwreck history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – March, 2017. A photomosaic of the Fame wrecksite. (C) Bournemouth University The Swash Channel leads to the main entrance of Poole Harbour in Dorset, and this is where the Swash Channel Wreck lies. The original name of the ship has been lost…

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A BALINGER FOR THE KING

By | History of technology, Maritime archaeology, Maritime history, Medieval history, Naval history, Shipbuilding, War history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – July 2016. Conjectural sketch of a balinger (C) Ian Friel 2015. Balingers were the frigates of medieval sea warfare: relatively fast, relatively small and suitable for a wide range of tasks, short of taking on a major enemy ship singlehanded….

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THE GRAVEYARD OF THE GREAT SHIPS

By | Local history, Maritime archaeology, Maritime history, Medieval history, Naval history, Political history, Shipwreck history, War history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – October 2015. The site at Bursledon: to the left, the site of the Grace Dieu, to the right, the possible site of the Holy Ghost. ‘But how do we know that?’ is a good question for people to ask of historians and…

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FIRESHIPS AND TERROR WEAPONS (PART 1)

By | Maritime archaeology, Maritime history, Religious history, War history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – August 2017. Although this 1956 reconstruction was intended to represent the Pilgrim Fathers’ 120-ton ship Mayflower of 1620, its design was largely based  on late 16th century English sources.  As such it gives a good idea of the appearance of the privately-owned ships in the…

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THE SEASICK HISTORIAN

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This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – April 2014. STS  Sir Winston Churchill, somewhere in the English Channel, December 1978.   OK, I’ve enhanced the photo: it wasn’t this green.  I was, though. December, 1978. The Sail Training Schooner Sir Winston Churchill sets out from Cherbourg on a grey morning into Force 8 winds……

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THE ANNIVERSARY WALTZ…

By | Maritime history, War history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – February 2014. A different sort of 1914 anniversary:  a plaque in Southampton marking the centenary of the death of the composer Charles Dibdin Anniversaries are not easy to escape, at least if you’re trying to interpret history.  The current plethora of…

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IN WITH THE OLD…?

By | Maritime history | No Comments

This article was originally published on my WordPress blog – January 2014. The first day of the New Year seems as good a time as any to start a new blog.   The old saying goes ‘out with the old, in with the new’, but it’s not quite appropriate for…

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